Between my flesh and the world's fingers

Opening 14 December 2021




Richter Gallery closes 2021 with Between my flesh and world’s fingers: group exhibition with the works of Grgur Akrap, Loren Erdrich, Katarina Janeckova, Jay Miriam, Marlon Wobst.


The inspiration that gives life to the exhibition, opening on December 14th, and to the title of the show refers to a documentary on Mary MacLane, American writer, nicknamed "Wild Woman of Butte". She was considered wild and out of control, a reputation that she herself nurtured, a fervent feminist, with a fluid and free sexuality, became very popular by scandalizing readers with her first memories, resulting in a true best seller.


“I like to believe that making art is also the result of an impetuous, out of control act and not of rational thought. - says Tommaso Richter - Between my flesh and worlds fingers aims to show the work of artists who face the intensity of spontaneity and the beauty of the unexpected ".


Despite the different approaches and different personal researches, the five artists, all belonging to the generation of the 80s, are driven by the urgency to convey a common vision. "Five very different artists, but united by the same feeling: that painting is intertwined with the world, from whose" flesh "it explodes, just as the living and perceiving body of the artist is intertwined. - Giuseppe Armogida writes in the critical text accompanying the exhibition -. Of the body, painting shares above all the enigmatic, ambiguous and undecidable nature: neither entirely subjective nor entirely objective, but an intertwining of life and inertia, of originality and mechanical repetition, of reality and imagination. But body and painting are related, above all, for their common expressive essence; of both the gesture, the ostensive capacity, the indication of something other than mere presence is fundamental. It is as if in their works these artists have wanted to capture and translate into images those deaf words, that language imbued with "implications", but above all with silence, which the world murmurs and which they listen to ".



TEXT BY GIUSEPPE ARMOGIDA


If you look through the eye, your brain gets blinded

I often wonder in which space fragment and time splinter Tommaso Richter’s gallery could be placed today. Mostly, in which specific point visitors are obliged to lose their gaze to the mechanism of a gallery that feels the need to return a too often neglected, market-unfitted complexity. With any new exhibit, on one hand the gallery rearranges itself following a centrifugal force that decentralizes gazes and thought layers that were established in previous exhibitions and, on the other hand, it mends such a subterranean swirl with a centripetal force, trying to create a new density around which further geometries of thought may throng.

This time Richter presents a five artist collective exhibit: Grgur Akrap, Loren Erdrich, Katarina Janeckova, Jay Miriam, and Marlon Wobst. Very different artists, sharing the same feeling: that painting intertwines with the world, exploding from its “flesh”, just as the artist ’s living and percipient body does.

As a matter of fact, the world should not be conceived as something foreign to us. The world is the heart of our flesh; our body is made of the same flesh as the world’s. The flesh is the uniform weave of the world returning to itself and harmonizing with itself. It is about that shared horizon of belonging, where subject and object are not accomplished yet and, therefore, perception is fulfilled in the blurred acts of perceiving and being perceived.

Thus, since every body is “taken” in the fabric of the world, is made of its very same cloth, is encrusted with its flesh, what are painters if not their "encounter" with the world? Where is the origin of painting if not in the contact point between the painter and the world? By lending their body to the world, painters turn the world into painting. Painters’ gaze is a tactile one, a “palpation” that is able to penetrate symbols, open and unclench the world. Painters look, still not as if they were extraneous to the world they are looking at. There is, indeed, a distance between painters and the world, but it is a flesh substance, which, far from separating, rouses a primordial familiarity and provides its inhabitants with what is necessary to feel everything that resembles them from the outside. Painting, therefore, has its origin in this in-between space, carnal interstitial space. Painting is made in between things, in the undivided communion of those who feel and what is felt.

Painting shares with bodies mainly their enigmatic, ambiguous, undecidable nature: neither fully subjective, nor completely objective, rather bind of life and passivity, originality and mechanical repetition, reality and imagination. Body and painting belong together, though, mostly due to their shared expressive essence; for them both, the gesture, the ostensive ability, the hint for something else beyond the simple presence is essential. It is a common thought that expression means representation, namely building a sign system in which to any signifier corresponds a significance. This is the reason why I often seek for “painting” in art galleries and find nothing but trapped, suffocating “artworks”, which are imprisoned in their shape and hostage of their very object. How can art possibly express the gathering of the body with its inhabited world and the conflict between the gaze and the things stimulating it through mere representation? It cannot, as the gesture of artistic expression really recovers the world, by reassembling it to get to know it. Art rearranges the prosaic world in the name of a truer relationship with things. Thus, the image shows the world without duplicating it, but exhibiting its unity and strength. The image refers to that “heat” that permeates and molds it, constantly acting upon it.

This is what happens with this exhibition, in which every single artwork displays traces of an inflammation; in which every artwork is the image of a burn and the action of keeping burning irradiating the emptiness that hosts the painting. It is as if, through their artworks, these artists - everyone in their own way - wanted to grasp and translate into images those deaf words, those voices, those accents, that language filled with allusions, punctuations, pauses, but mostly silence, which the world murmurs and the common thought prefers to ignore, but they listen to instead. And in the act of giving back, through the signs traced by the hand, the way in which their eye has been “touched” by the world, they provide with visible existence what a profane sight deems invisible and often unlivable. Qualities, lights, shadows, colors, surfaces, depths, they are all just before us, in the exhibited artworks, solely because they have roused an echo in these artists’ bodies, solely because they have welcomed, selected and gathered them on the basis of a hidden formula, wisely balancing control and lack of control, intentionality and randomness, calculation and unforeseen events.

Hence, they are artists trying to elude the ordinary language by relying on painting. And, even when they catch daily life moments, they try to void that coexistence agreement with the world that we misleadingly think to have achieved. Not only do they enunciate what we already know, but they introduce us to new experiences and perspectives, and have us getting rid of our prejudices. Such perspective, though, will be ours only if we let our eyes be surprised by these space and color layouts and be catapulted to an unexpected journey through sensations, drives, buried desires, in a quest for solid emotions. In this way only, such artworks can supply emblems which sense will remain undeveloped, evoking any kind of variation.

And when we will be “reached” by the artwork, with no mediator, with no guide but a certain trace of the brush, we mysteriously bump into the sense of the gesture that created it. And all of a sudden, the current data mean far more than they show. The shapes appearing clear and neat, reach us in a shape that is blurry, permeable, and sparkling at the same time; they “bleed”, as if they were spreading their substance before our eyes. We can decide to stare at a fire, to be reassured by a reconciled and recognizable image. Or we can take the chance to let our desire carry us, letting it set an autofocus that selects the image according to its rules and laws. All this, though - let us be warned - can turn into a dangerous game.



BIOGRAPHIES


Grgur Akrap

In the painting series „Blind Painter“ I painted very spontaneously and intuitively what appeared to me like internal visions. The title of the exhibition „Blind painter“ refers to reality which is not so visible, deceptive and intrusive as the physical reality we live in. I would call these images a kind of reflections of the spirit. However, it is important to say that I did not paint to tell a story, the intention was to bypass the language of words and completely indulge in the language of painting. As for interpretation, I would let everyone to see what they want or can see, it’s a kind of poetry of painting.

Grgur Akrap was born on August 5, 1988 in Zagreb. In 2013 he graduated from the art education department at the Academy of Fine Arts, University of Zagreb under the tutoring o Professor Damir Sokić. He is a member of the Croatian Association of Artists since 2012 and a member of Independent Artists since 2018.He has exhibited in numerous group and solo exhibitions, in Croatia and abroad. He received the prize for the best young artist at the third Biennial of painting, the Zagreb Museum of Contemporary Art Prize for the young artist on the 51st Zagreb Salon, the Iva Vraneković Prize-prize from the artist to the artist on the 4th Biennial of painting and Grand Prix Erste Fragments 15. He lives and works in Zagreb.


Loren Erdrich

Water takes a primary material role in my process - raw pigments and dyes are applied unbound, mixed solely with water, to canvas and muslin. Forms simultaneously emerge and dissolve as water erodes the rigidity of the medium and ground. I savor the push/pull between deliberate and unintentional movements. My relationship to and physical use of water informs my content: water gives rise to a world that celebrates fluidity. Porous boundaries are usually at odds with a society dependent on clearly defined borders to maintain order. Bodies that menstruate, give birth, are penetrated and suffer metamorphoses have long been portrayed as monstrous. Instead, my work conjures a world in which such softness and vulnerability is celebrated instead of shamed. Bodies merge with their environments through immersion, reflection, camouflage, and decay. At times the flesh itself becomes a landscape in its fragility, mutability and resilience. I reconsider porousness and malleability as forces of strength and connection. I lean towards moments which dissolve the separation between outside and inside, me and you, this world and the other-worldly. Ultimately each piece comfortably resides on the threshold of existence and extinction.

Loren Erdrich has exhibited in New York, Detroit, London, Berlin, Copenhagen and beyond. She has been awarded residencies at the Jentel Foundation, Santa Fe Art Institute, Sculpture Space, the Vermont Studio Center and thrice at Art Farm Nebraska. Erdrich frequently collaborates with the poet Sierra Nelson, coauthoring the award winning I Take Back the Sponge Cake (published by Rose Metal Press) and Isolation (limited edition, 2020). She holds an MFA from the Burren College of Art at the National University of Ireland, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a BA from the University of Pennsylvania. Erdrich lives and works in New York, NY.


Marlon Wobst

Clear and understandable things happen in my works. The images I create while painting, drawing, felt or working with clay and glazes usually revolve around us. People who go through their daily challenges such as getting dressed, eating, sleeping or carrying something. Composition, color, and especially when painting, surface treatment are at least as important as the image I show - in fact, most of the time I use the representation of something as a motive and justification to start juggling with these elements.

While painting is a very traditional technique in fine art, wet felting is mostly seen as traditional arts and crafts. To stand out from that, my felt works are mostly huge, colorful, flat, and often show explicit content compared to painting with oil paints on a canvas. In terms of creating an image, this is the most outstanding feature for me - felt can continually grow and change as I work on it, which makes for a whole new experience for me to create an image.

Even though I see myself primarily as a painter, all the techniques I use influence and stimulate each other and help me form a better image of what I want to show.


Marlon Wobst (Wiesbaden 1980), graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Mainz and then continued and completed his studies with the University of the Arts in Berlin.

Among the main solo exhibitions:

SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlin 2022, Galerie Maria Lund, Paris 2022, Tides, Galleria KANT, Copenhagen 202, SPA, SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlin 2020, FRIENDS, Summerhall, Edinburgh 2020, RELAX, Galerie Maria Lund, Paris 2020, Haare, SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlin 2018

Among the main group exhibitions:

Between my flesh and world's fingers, Richter Fine Art, Roma 2021, The Island Summer Show 2020, Galleria KANT, Fanø 2020, Summer Thinking, Galeria Maria Lund, Paris 2020, LOVE LAND, SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlin0 2018, Bird / Plane, New Release Gallery, New York 2017, Selected Paintings, KANT Gallery, Copenhagen 2016


Jay Miriam

In her large-scale oil paintings, Brooklyn-based artist Jay Miriam finds beauty in the mundane. She examines what lies in the ordinary, captivated by the seemingly small moments of life. Miriam’s contemplative practice involves painting from memory, or imagining new worlds from scratch, and through bold mark making and loose brush strokes, creates stories entirely their own. Known for her portrayals of nude feminine figures, Miriam’s subjects exude a playful sense of mystery. Often there are elements to her paintings that would physically be impossible in the real world, whether an elongated arm, or in this case, the placements of the woman’s legs, however; in the composition Miriam plays with the movement of the eye to convince the viewer these moments feel right. The perception of the viewer is as important to the whole of the painting as the painting itself. Jay Miriam works with traditional oil techniques, and often paintings take months or up to a year to complete.

Born in New York City (1990) and raised in Brooklyn, Miriam earned a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University and an MFA from the New York Academy of Art.

Jay Miriam has upcoming solo exhibitions in Galleria Richter (Rome, 2022) and Gruin Gallery (Los Angeles, 2022). Previous main solo exhibitions include Fantasies in a Waking State (Ornis A. Gallery, 2017, Amsterdam); Catch the Heavenly Bodies (Half Gallery, 2016, New York, NY); Blue Paintings of Women (Ornis A. Gallery, 2014, Amsterdam), and JM (Cudowne Lata, 2011, Krakow, Poland).

Recent Select Group Exhibitions include: 2021 Apostolic Succession, Spurs Gallery, Beijing, China, curated by Half Gallery

2021 Breakfast in America, Seasons Gallery, Los Angeles, LA 2021 The Nature of Women, Art She Says, London, England 2020 Riders of the Red Horse, The Pit LA, Los Angeles, CA

2020 Corps Primaires, Galerie C.O.A., Montreal, Quebec

2020 UNDERGLASS 2, Half Gallery, New York, NY

2020 Zwang, C.G.Boerner, New York, NY, curated by Kylie Manning 2017 Hors d’oeuvre, Half Gallery, New York, NY

2017 New York or Nowhere, Olsen Gallery, Sydney, Australia


Katarina Janeckova

Katarina Janeckova Walshe (Bratislava 1988).

She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Bratislava, she has well earned a distinguished position among the best talents of her generation.

She succeeded in this feat not only due to her characteristically relaxed and marked by emotional expressiveness painting, but especially thanks to the honesty with which she portrays her unconventional experiences. This fusion of particular experiences, events, feelings and thoughts makes a special light and energy in her work.

Katarina Janeckova documents her life to such an extent that her respective works can almost be perceived as diary entries. However she does not rely entirely on external reality, but equal, if not greater, her attention is always directed to her inner world.


The main exhibition projects include: No pain No gain, Flatgallery (Bratislava 2013), So Many Fish, So Little Time, SOGA, (Bratislava 2014), Bears, Catastrophes and other everyday events, NOVA Galerie, (Prague 2015), SALMON LOVERS, Galerie Wolfsen, (Aalborg 2015), How To Make a Bear Fall in Love, Studio D'Arte Raffaelli, (Trento 2016).

Awards: Painting of the Year 2012, VUB Foundation Award, 3rd. place 2012

2nd place at Euromobil Award Group / Under 30 Award,

Arte Fiera Bologna 2017

2017, group exhibition, ComSurrogate, Richter Fine Art gallery.

2018 Untitled Art Fair, San Francisco, represented by the Allouche Gallery.

2018 group exhibition, Redness, the Copper house gallery Dublin, Ireland.

2018 Who seeks finds, Richter Fine Art, Rome, Italy

2019 Symbiosis, K-Space, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA

2020 Secrets of a Happy Household, Dittrich & Schlechtriem, Berlin, Germany

2020 Bad Habits, good intentions, Althuis Hofland Fine Arts, Amsterdam, Netherlands


Group Show:

2018 PAIRS, Rare Gallery, Dublin, Ireland

2019 Animal Idealism, Harpy Gallery, New York

2019 PAINT, ALSO KNOWN AS BLOOD, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw, Poland

2020 Lovers after life, Galleria Richter, Rome, Italy


-----------------------------------------------------------------


La Galleria Richter chiude il 2021 con Between my flesh and world’s fingers: mostra collettiva con i lavori di Grgur Akrap, Loren Erdrich, Katarina Janeckova, Jay Miriam, Marlon Wobst.

L’ispirazione che dà vita alla mostra, in apertura il prossimo 14 Dicembre, e al titolo della collettiva si riferisce a un documentario su Mary MacLane, scrittrice americana, soprannominata “Wild Woman of Butte”. Era considerata selvaggia e fuori controllo, una reputazione che lei stessa nutriva, fervente femminista, dalla sessualità fluida e libera, divenne molto popolare scandalizzando i lettori con le sue prime memorie, dando vita a un vero best seller.

“Mi piace credere che il fare arte sia anche il risultato di un atto impetuoso, fuori controllo e non di un pensiero razionale. – afferma Tommaso Richter - Between my flesh and world’s fingers si propone di mostrare il lavoro di artisti e artiste che affrontano l'intensità della spontaneità e la bellezza dell'imprevisto”.

Nonostante le differenti modalità d’approccio e le diverse ricerche personali, i cinque artisti, appartenenti tutti alla generazione degli anni ‘80, sono guidati dall’urgenza di trasmettere una visione comune. “Cinque artisti molto diversi tra loro, ma accomunati da un medesimo sentire: che la pittura si intreccia con il mondo, dalla cui “carne” essa esplode, proprio come vi si intreccia il corpo vivente e percipiente dell’artista. – Scrive Giuseppe Armogida nel testo critico che accompagna la mostra -. Del corpo la pittura condivide anzitutto la natura enigmatica, ambigua e indecidibile: né del tutto soggettiva né del tutto oggettiva, ma intreccio di vita e inerzia, di originalità e ripetizione meccanica, di realtà e immaginazione. Ma corpo e pittura si apparentano, soprattutto, per la loro comune essenza espressiva; di entrambi è fondamentale il gesto, la capacità ostensiva, l’indicazione di qualcosa d’altro oltre la semplice presenza. È come se nelle loro opere questi artisti abbiano voluto captare e tradurre in immagini quelle parole sorde, quella lingua intramata di “sottintesi”, ma soprattutto di silenzio, che il mondo mormora e che essi ascoltano”.



TESTO DI GIUSEPPE ARMOGIDA


Se guardi con gli occhi, il cervello si acceca

Spesso mi chiedo in quale frammento di spazio e in quale scheggia di tempo si situi oggi la galleria di Tommaso Richter. E, soprattutto, in quale punto preciso il visitatore è costretto a inscrivere il proprio sguardo all’interno del meccanismo di una galleria che – nell’esigenza di provare a restituire una complessità oggi troppo spesso accantonata, in quanto istanza marginale non adatta al mercato –, ad ogni nuova mostra, da un lato si riorganizza secondo una forza centrifuga che decentra gli sguardi e gli strati di pensiero delineati nelle mostre precedenti e, dall’altro, ricuce questo vortice sotterraneo attraverso una forza centripeta che prova a creare una nuova densità intorno a cui affollare ulteriori geometrie di pensiero.

Questa volta Richter presenta una collettiva di cinque artisti: Grgur Akrap, Loren Erdrich, Katarina Janeckova, Jay Miriam e Marlon Wobst. Cinque artisti molto diversi tra loro, ma accomunati da un medesimo sentire: che la pittura si intreccia con il mondo, dalla cui “carne” essa esplode, proprio come vi si intreccia il corpo vivente e percipiente dell’artista.

Il mondo, infatti, non deve essere pensato come qualcosa di esterno a noi. Il mondo è nel cuore della nostra carne; il nostro corpo è fatto della stessa carne del mondo. La carne è la trama unitaria del mondo che ritorna in sé e si accorda con se stessa. È quell’orizzonte comune di appartenenza in cui soggetto e oggetto non sono ancora costituiti e, quindi, la percezione si compie nell’indistinzione di percepire ed essere percepiti.

Perciò, dal momento che ogni corpo è “preso” nel tessuto del mondo, è fatto della sua medesima stoffa, è incrostato nella sua carne, cos’altro è il pittore se non il suo “incontro” col mondo? Dove nasce la pittura se non nel punto di contatto tra pittore e mondo? È prestando il suo corpo al mondo che il pittore trasforma il mondo in pittura. Lo sguardo del pittore è uno sguardo tattile, una “palpazione” capace di penetrare il simbolico, di aprire e schiudere il mondo. Il pittore guarda, ma non come fosse estraneo al mondo che guarda. Tra pittore e mondo, infatti, vi è sì una distanza, ma si tratta di uno spessore di carne, che, lungi dal separare, risveglia una familiarità primordiale e offre a chi lo abita quanto occorre per sentire tutto ciò che all’esterno gli somiglia. La pittura, dunque, nasce in questo spazio in-between, spazio interstiziale carnale. La pittura si fa nel mezzo delle cose, nell’indivisa comunione del senziente e del sentito.

Del corpo la pittura condivide anzitutto la natura enigmatica, ambigua e indecidibile: né del tutto soggettiva né del tutto oggettiva, ma intreccio di vita e inerzia, di originalità e ripetizione meccanica, di realtà e immaginazione. Ma corpo e pittura si apparentano, soprattutto, per la loro comune essenza espressiva; di entrambi è fondamentale il gesto, la capacità ostensiva, l’indicazione di qualcosa d’altro oltre la semplice presenza. Solitamente si pensa che l’atto di esprimere consista nel rappresentare, cioè nel costruire un sistema di segni tale che a ogni elemento significante corrisponda un elemento significato. Questo è il motivo per cui spesso mi capita di cercare “la pittura” nelle gallerie d’arte, ma di non trovare che “opere”, ingabbiate e soffocanti, prigioniere della loro forma e spesso ostaggi del loro stesso soggetto. Ma può forse l’arte esprimere l’incontro del corpo con il mondo che abita e il conflitto dello sguardo con le cose che lo sollecitano mediante la mera rappresentazione? Assolutamente no, perché il gesto d’espressione artistico compie un vero e proprio recupero del mondo, che riassembla per conoscerlo. L’arte riordina il mondo prosaico in nome di un rapporto più vero con le cose. L’immagine, dunque, mostra il mondo non duplicandolo, ma esibendone l’unità e la forza. L’immagine rinvia a quel “calore” che la permea modellandola e che agisce costantemente in lei.

È quanto accade in questa mostra, in cui ogni singola opera ci riporta la traccia di un’infiammazione; in cui ogni opera è l’immagine di una bruciatura e di un continuare a bruciare che irradia il vuoto in cui si inserisce la pittura. È come se nelle loro opere questi artisti – ognuno a suo modo – abbiano voluto captare e tradurre in immagini quelle parole sorde, quelle voci, quegli accenti, quella lingua intramata di sottintesi, di interpunzioni, di cesure, ma soprattutto di silenzio, che il mondo mormora, che il pensiero comune preferisce ignorare, e che essi, invece, ascoltano. E nel restituire, mediante i segni tracciati dalla mano, il modo in cui il loro occhio è stato “toccato” dal mondo, essi donano esistenza visibile a ciò che la visione profana crede invisibile e spesso invivibile. Qualità, luci, ombre, colori, superfici, profondità, sono davanti a noi, nelle opere esposte, soltanto perché hanno risvegliato in questi artisti un’eco nel loro corpo, soltanto perché essi li hanno accolti, selezionati e messi insieme sulla base di una formula nascosta, bilanciando sapientemente controllo e assenza di controllo, intenzionalità e casualità, calcolo e imprevisto.

Insomma, sono artisti che tentano di bypassare il linguaggio ordinario affidandosi a quello della pittura. E, anche laddove catturano momenti di vita quotidiana, cercano di sospendere quel patto di coesistenza che ci siamo illusi di aver concluso con il mondo. Non si limitano mai a enunciare ciò che già conosciamo, ma al contrario ci introducono a esperienze e prospettive nuove, facendoci sbarazzare dei nostri pregiudizi. Prospettive, però, che saranno nostre solo a condizione che i nostri occhi si lascino sorprendere da queste configurazioni di spazio e di colore e si lascino catapultare in un viaggio imprevisto attraverso sensazioni, pulsioni e desideri sepolti, alla ricerca di concrete emozioni. Solo così queste opere possono fornirci degli emblemi di cui non finiremo mai di sviluppare il senso, evocando ogni sorta di varianti.

E nel momento in cui siamo “raggiunti” dall’opera, senza nessun altro intermediario, senza nessun’altra guida se non un certo tracciato del pennello, reincrociamo misteriosamente il senso del gesto che l’ha creata. Ed ecco che, tutt’a un tratto, i dati attuali significano ben oltre ciò che manifestano. Le forme che prima ci apparivano chiare e definite, ci giungono sfocate, porose e, allo stesso tempo, scintillanti; “sanguinano”, come se spargessero sotto i nostri occhi la loro sostanza. Possiamo decidere di fissare un fuoco, di rassicurarci in un’immagine riconciliata e riconoscibile. Oppure rischiare di lasciar fare al nostro desiderio, lasciandogli impostare un autofocus che selezioni l’immagine secondo le sue regole e le sue leggi. Ma tutto ciò – è bene che lo sappiamo – può diventare un gioco pericoloso.

BIOGRAFIE


Loren Erdrich:

L'acqua assume un ruolo principale nel mio processo pittorico: pigmenti grezzi e coloranti vengono applicati non legati, miscelati esclusivamente con acqua su tela. Le forme emergono e si dissolvono simultaneamente mentre l'acqua erode la rigidità del mezzo e del terreno. Assaporo il push/pull tra movimenti deliberati e non intenzionali.

Il mio rapporto e l'uso fisico dell'acqua informano i miei contenuti: l'acqua dà origine a un mondo che celebra la fluidità. I confini porosi sono di solito in contrasto con una società che dipende da confini chiaramente definiti per mantenere l'ordine. I corpi che hanno le mestruazioni, partoriscono, sono penetrati e subiscono metamorfosi sono stati a lungo dipinti come mostruosi. Invece, il mio lavoro evoca un mondo in cui tale morbidezza e vulnerabilità vengono celebrate invece che vergognose. I corpi si fondono con i loro ambienti attraverso l'immersione, la riflessione, il camuffamento e il decadimento. A volte la carne stessa diventa un paesaggio nella sua fragilità, mutevolezza e resilienza. Riconsiderare la porosità e la malleabilità come forze di forza e connessione.

Mi appoggio a momenti che dissolvono la separazione tra fuori e dentro, io e te, questo mondo e l'altro mondo. In definitiva, ogni pezzo risiede comodamente sulla soglia dell'esistenza e dell’estinzione.


Loren Erdrich ha esposto a New York, Detroit, Londra, Berlino, Copenaghen e oltre. Ha ricevuto residenze presso la Jentel Foundation, il Santa Fe Art Institute, lo Sculpture Space, il Vermont Studio Center e tre volte all'Art Farm Nebraska. Erdrich collabora spesso con la poetessa Sierra Nelson, coautore del pluripremiato I Take Back the Sponge Cake (pubblicato da Rose Metal Press) e Isolation (edizione limitata, 2020). Ha conseguito un MFA presso il Burren College of Art della National University of Ireland, un BFA presso la School of the Art Institute of Chicago e un BA presso l'Università della Pennsylvania. Erdrich vive e lavora a New York, NY.


Grgur Akrap:

Nella serie di dipinti "Blind Painter" ho dipinto in modo molto spontaneo e intuitivo quelle che mi sembravano visioni interiori. Il titolo della mostra "Blind painter" si riferisce alla realtà che non è così visibile, ingannevole e invadente come la realtà fisica in cui viviamo. Definirei queste immagini una sorta di riflessi dello spirito. Tuttavia, è importante dire che non ho dipinto per raccontare una storia, l'intenzione era quella di scavalcare il linguaggio delle parole e abbandonarsi completamente al linguaggio della pittura. Per quanto riguarda l'interpretazione, farei vedere a tutti quello che vogliono o possono vedere, è una sorta di poesia della pittura.

Grgur Akrap è nato il 5 agosto 1988 a Zagabria. Nel 2013 si è laureato presso il dipartimento di educazione artistica presso l'Accademia di Belle Arti, Università di Zagabria sotto il tutoraggio o il professor Damir Sokić. È membro dell'Associazione croata degli artisti dal 2012 e membro di Artisti indipendenti dal 2018.

Ha esposto in numerose mostre collettive e personali, in Croazia e all'estero. Ha ricevuto il premio per il miglior giovane artista alla terza Biennale di pittura, Premio del Museo di arte contemporanea di Zagabria per il giovane artista il 51. Salone di Zagabria, Premio Iva Vraneković-premio dall'artista all'artista il 4. Biennale di pittura e Grand Prix Erste Fragments 15 .

Vive e lavora a Zagabria.

Jay Miriam:

Nata a New York City e cresciuto a Brooklyn, Miriam ha conseguito un BFA presso la Carnegie Mellon University e un MFA presso la New York Academy of Art.

Jay Miriam dipinge ritratti di persone comuni che fanno e compiono azioni e cose di tutti i giorni.

Personaggi che si lavano i denti, che chiacchierano o aspettano un appuntamento al bar, sono tutte azioni particolarmente interessanti per l’artista. Azioni che facciamo e compiamo senza rendercene conto talmente siamo presi dalla routine quotidiana.

Jay Miriam dipinge dalla memoria, non usa la fotografia, computer o proiettori nel suo processo pittorico. Estrae da un ricordo o una storia reinterpretata.

Creare un mondo poetico per rappresentare un'emozione, un'istanza o una relazione specifica. Spesso ogni dipinto richiede mesi e fino a un anno per essere completato.

Mostre personali principali:

Fantasies in a Waking State, Ornis A. Gallery, Amsterdam (2017); Catch the Heavenly Bodies, Half Gallery, New York,(2016); Blue Paintings of Women, Ornis A. Gallery, Amsterdam (2014); Youth and Beauty Parade, Ornis A. Gallery, Amsterdam (2013), and JM, Cudowne Lata, Krakow, Poland (2011).

Katarina Janeckova:

Katarina Janeckova Walshe (Bratislava 1988).

Diplomata all’accademia di belle Arti di Bratislava, si è ben guadagnata una posizione distinta tra i migliori talenti della sua generazione.

Lei è riuscita in questa impresa non solo dovuta per la sua pittura caratteristicamente rilassata e marcata da espressività emozionali ma specialmente grazie all’onestà con la quale lei ritrae le sue esperienze non convenzionali. Questa fusione di particolari esperienze, eventi, sentimenti e pensieri rendono una speciale luce ed energia nel suo lavoro.

Katarina Janeckova documenta la sua vita a tal punto che le sue rispettive opere possono essere percepite quasi come voci di diario. Comunque lei non si affida interamente alla realtà esterna, ma uguale, se non maggiore, l'attenzione è rivolta sempre al suo mondo interiore.

Tra i principali progetti espositivi si segnala: No pain No gain, Flatgallery (Bratislava 2013), So Many Fish, So Little Time, SOGA, (Bratislava 2014), Bears, Catastrophes and other everyday events, NOVA Galerie, (Praga 2015), SALMON LOVERS, Galerie Wolfsen, (Aalborg 2015), How To Make a Bear Fall in Love, Studio D'Arte Raffaelli, (Trento 2016).

Premi: Painting of the Year 2012, VUB Foundation Award, 3rd. place 2012

2nd place at Gruppo Euromobil Award / Premio Under 30,

Arte Fiera Bologna 2017

2017, mostra collettiva, ComSurrogate, galleria Richter Fine Art.

2018 Untitled Art Fair, San Francisco, rappresentata dalla Allouche Gallery.

2018 mostra collettiva, Redness, the Copper house gallery Dublin, Ireland.

2018 Chi cerca trova, Richter Fine Art, Rome, Italy

2019 Symbiosis, K-Space, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA

2020 Secrets of a Happy Household, Dittrich & Schlechtriem, Berlin, Germany

2020 Bad Habits, good intentions, Althuis Hofland Fine Arts, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Group Show:

2018 PAIRS, Rare Gallery, Dublin, Ireland

2019 Animal Idealism, Harpy Gallery, New York

2019 PAINT, ALSO KNOWN AS BLOOD, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw, Poland

2020 Lovers after life, Galleria Richter, Rome, Italy

Marlon Wobst

Nelle mie opere accadono cose chiare e comprensibili. Le immagini che creo mentre dipingo, disegno, feltro o lavoro con l'argilla e gli smalti di solito ruotano intorno a noi. Persone che vivono le loro sfide quotidiane come vestirsi, mangiare, dormire o trasportare qualcosa. La composizione, il colore e, soprattutto durante la pittura, il trattamento della superficie sono importanti almeno quanto l'immagine che mostro - infatti, il più delle volte uso la rappresentazione di qualcosa come motivo e giustificazione per iniziare a destreggiarmi con queste elementi.

Mentre la pittura è una tecnica molto tradizionale nelle belle arti, l'infeltrimento bagnato è per lo più visto come arti e mestieri tradizionali. Per distinguersi da ciò, i miei lavori in feltro sono per lo più enormi, colorati, piatti e spesso mostrano un contenuto esplicito rispetto alla pittura con colori ad olio su una tela. In termini di creazione di un'immagine, questa è la caratteristica più eccezionale per me: il feltro può crescere e cambiare continuamente mentre ci lavoro, il che rende per me un'esperienza completamente nuova creare un'immagine.

Anche se mi vedo in primo luogo come un pittore, tutte le tecniche che uso si influenzano e si stimolano a vicenda e mi aiutano a formare un'immagine migliore di ciò che voglio mostrare.

Marlon Wobst (Wiesbaden 1980), si diploma all’accademia di Belle Arti a Mainz per poi proseguire e concludere gli studi con l’università delle Arti a Berlino.

Tra le principali mostre personali:

SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlino 2022, Galerie Maria Lund, Parigi 2022, Tides, Galleria KANT, Copenhagen 202, SPA, SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlino 2020, FRIENDS, Summerhall, Edinburgo 2020, RELAX, Galerie Maria Lund, Parigi 2020, Haare, SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlino 2018

Tra le principali mostre collettive:

Between my flesh and world's fingers, Richter Fine Art, Roma 2021, The Island Summer Show 2020, Galleria KANT, Fanø 2020, Summer Thinking, Galeria Maria Lund, Paris 2020, LOVE LAND, SCHWARZ CONTEMPORARY, Berlin0 2018, Bird / Plane, New Release Gallery, New York 2017, Selected Paintings, Galleria KANT, Copenhagen 2016